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Resolutions

National Disaster Mitigation Program

Year: 2017

Resolution

Whereas the Government of Canada has earmarked $200 million over five years for the establishment of a National Disaster Mitigation Program (NDMP); and

Whereas municipal projects may be funded under the NDMP, but only as part of submissions from provinces and territories; and 

Whereas the Town of Kindersley did recently attempt to apply to the NDMP for a project within the project streams, as defined by Public Safety Canada, and was informed by the Policy and Program Services Branch, Ministry of Government Relations, Government of Saskatchewan that “at this time, municipalities in Saskatchewan are not able to apply for NDMP funding. However, the province is looking into how to provide municipalities with access to the NDMP funding in the future.”

Therefore, be it resolved that the SUMA seek clarification from the Government of Canada and the Government of Saskatchewan as to why the National Disaster Mitigation Program is unavailable to municipalities in Saskatchewan, when it has been made available to municipalities in other provinces.

Background:

The Government of Canada, Public Safety Canada website states, in part:

In recognition of increasing disaster risks and costs, Budget 2014 earmarked a total of $200 million over five years to establish the National Disaster Mitigation Program (NDMP) as part of the Government's commitment to building safer and more resilient communities. Of that $200 million, $183.8 million is allocated as NDMP contribution funds for NDMP projects that will be cost-shared with provinces and territories.

and

The objective of the (NDMP) is to reduce the impacts of natural disasters on Canadians by:
  1. Focusing investments on significant, recurring flood risks and costs; and
  2. Advancing work to facilitate private residential insurance for overland flooding; and NDMP funds may be provided for the following types of mitigation projects:
  1. New projects or existing projects that have been developed but have not been identified for funding; and
  2. Non-structural or small scale structural mitigation projects.
The NDMP is a merit-based program consisting of four project streams: Risk Assessments (Stream 1), Flood Mapping (Stream 2), Mitigation Planning (Stream 3), and Investments in Non-Structural and Small Scale Structural Mitigation Projects (Stream 4).
Provinces/Territories may submit a project proposal for any project stream. However, they must demonstrate that they have met the requirements for that stream, as applicable.

Provincial Response

  • The National Disaster Mitigation Program (NDMP) is a federal cost-sharing flood mitigation program made available to the provinces. There is no municipal access to the NDMP. However, provinces are encouraged by the federal government to create a provincial program allowing municipalities to apply for the funding. 
  • Some jurisdictions in Canada have opened the NDMP to municipalities, but some have not for various reasons. The NDMP requires considerable administrative overhead, there are no per capita funding allocations (projects are awarded on a competitive basis), and the focus of the program is to complete Risk Assessments, Flood Plain Mapping, Planning and small scale structural projects. As such, there are considerable costs associated with creating a program to apply for very limited federal funding.
  • The province, through the Water Security Agency, delivers the Emergency Flood Damage Reduction Program (EFDRP). The EFDRP provides technical assistance and grant funding for individuals, urban and rural municipalities, businesses and First Nations for approved permanent flood protection works built to provide protection from an imminent risk of flooding (berms, ditches, etc.). It also provides for temporary flood protection measures like the purchase of sandbags and pumping. 
  • Other federal government programs like the New Building Canada Fund and Gas Tax Fund already provide municipalities with an opportunity to apply for more substantial federal disaster mitigation infrastructure funding. The mitigation component of the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangement is also a potential source of funding. How to access these various federal programs is being discussed within the ministry and with the municipal associations. A meeting was recently held with the associations to discuss this matter. The parties agreed to develop a strategy to address the issue of municipal access to various federal disaster mitigation programs. These discussions will include possible municipal access to the NDMP. 
  • Government Relations, with assistance from the municipal associations, will continue to explore administrative options for municipal access to the NDMP.
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